1. my-nothing-face:

    Although El Greco was Greek by birth, he ignored the mythology and history of his fatherland. The only exception was this canvas of Laocoön and his sons. Greco probably painted this for his own pleasure, a challenge to the famous sculpture group discovered in 1506, which was one of the sights of Rome when he visited that city on 1569. He seems to never have sold his version of the myth, for a Laocoön was listed in the inventory of his estate in 1614.

    (Source: dothepain, via hotlesbiantrapqueen)

     
  2. artruby:

    Joseph Kosuth, Five Words in Green Neon, (1965).

    (via vixisse)

     
  3. colin-vian:

     René Magritte - The gradation of fire, 1939

    (via truthmagic)

     
  4. erynlou:

     Agnes Martin, Aspiration, 1960

    (via cerealfor-dinner)

     
  5.  
  6. likeafieldmouse:

    Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)

    (via rommy)

     
  7. prelovers:

    Hands of Jean Cocteau | Berenice Abbott

    (via paigethloveslife)

     
  8. aestheticgoddess:

    Leda and the Swan, Cy Twombly

    (via fragmentedaesthetic)

     
  9. Wassily Kandinsky, “Tanzkurven: Zu den Tänzen der Palucca,” Das Kunstblatt, Potsdam, vol. 10, no. 3 (1926)

    (Source: theloudest--minds, via egonschielejetaime)

     
  10. urbain:

    Fabio Alessandro Fusco, Saut dans le vide [le difficile défi des Nouveaux Réalistes Italiens], 2013

    Citation de “Leap into the Void”, Yves Klein, 1960.

    Compare with Bernard Tschumi, “Advertisements for Architecture”, 1978.

    (via saltandppepa)

     
  11. aestheticgoddess:

    Salvador Dali, Inagural Gooseflesh, 1928

    (via polyeucte-de-melitena)

     
  12. aqqindex:

    Carlo Mollino, Casa Miller, 1936

    (via ultralunna)

     
  13. abridurif:

    Oeuvres de Kasimir Malevitch / exposition suprématiste, Petrograd, 1915

    (via emersions)

     
  14. aestheticgoddess:

    Interior with mirrored wall, Roy Lichtenstein, 1991

    (via mmmenz)

     
  15. polyeucte-de-melitena:

    Bartolomeo Vivarini (Italian, c. 1432 – c. 1499), Madonna and Child, c. 1475, tempera and gold on panel.